The Farm Well

History of the Quilt

Objectives

Project Description

Evaluations of Accomplishments

Future Plans for the Project

Proposal Letter

Request to Commissioners

Biographies by Homemakers Clubs

Biographies by Friends of the Library

THE STORY OF THE QUILT SQUARE: THE FARM WELL, BY SUMMERVILLE EXTENSION HOMEMAKERS CLUB FOR HARNETT COUNTY HISTORICAL QUILT, 1989

The Farm Well

Plumbing systems for rural usage were non-existent when Harnett County was formed in 1855, but the farm well was a source of life for every living creature: for the family, for plants, for animals that tilled soil, for animals raised for food consumption, for transportation, and also for pets.

Unfortunately wells were not used for irrigation of gardens or cash crops, as rural electricity had not been introduced to generate power. Consequently, plant life, on the large scale, was dependent on rain from above.

Most wells were located near the barn that housed the animals, and, most of the time, only one well was sufficient for the stock.

For household usage another well was dug near the homeplace or incorporated in a porch area of the house. Besides furnishing water, the well was often used for food preservation by lowering containers down to the water level by a rope and leaving the food for a selected time.

WeIls were either open or covered. Water was brought to the surface by wood or galvanized buckets attached to each end of a rope or chain thrown over a raised pulley at the top of the well and manually drawn. The frame of the well was built of wooden boards, of any kind of wood that was available. However, redwood, if it could be obtained, was the most lasting. Seldom, if ever were the frames painted.

 

Written by: Evelyn Byrd, Member

Summerville Extension Homemakers Club

Quilt Square: Designed by Evelyn Byrd

Row 7 Number 34

Embroidery and applique: Evelyn Byrd