Williams Grove School

History of the Quilt

Objectives

Project Description

Evaluations of Accomplishments

Future Plans for the Project

Proposal Letter

Request to Commissioners

Biographies by Homemakers Clubs

Biographies by Friends of the Library

STORY OF THE QUILT SQUARE, WILLIAMS GROVE SCHOOL BY AMBASSADOR EXTENSION HOMEMAKERS CLUB FOR THE HARNETT COUNTY HISTORICAL QUILT, 1989.

WILLIAMS GROVE SCHOOL

Williams Grove School was located about two miles east of the Town of Angier near Williams Crossroad. It was built in 1892 on land owned by the late Hughie Williams near the Benson Road, and was a two room building. The first teachers were a Mr. Taylor, brother of Judge Floyd Taylor, his sister, Alice Taylor, and Lela Morris. The school house was built by donations of wood and some labor from people in the community. Mr. Newbern Gardner had a sawmill that cut and sawed the donated trees into lumber. The county then proceeded to provide funds for the construction of the building.

The school term ran for four months, October through January, with only one teacher each term in the beginning. Later on as the enrollment grew two teachers were employed. The salary paid was $30.00 per month, later $45.00. In the beginning there were 25-30 pupils, later increasing to 40-50. The school hours were from 8 am to 4 pm with one short recess in the morning, 1 hour for lunch, and a short recess in the afternoon. On Friday afternoons a spelling bee was held, and occasionally a community gathering was held with a sale of pies and cakes donated by people in the community. The proceeds from the sale went for the benefit of the school. Parents were responsible for furnishing books and supplies to their children.

Some other known teachers following the first named were John Q. Stephenson, Sylvester Wilson, Harvey Stephenson, Mattie Stephenson, Mamie Williams, Charlie Partin, Louise Rogerson, Craft Matthews and Nina Matthews. Misses Rogerson, Matthews and Matthews were not local teachers, so they boarded in homes near the school during the school term.

Sometime during December, 1925, the building caught fire, but luckily it was discovered in time and was not destroyed. However, it was damaged to such an extent the county decided it should be condemned and school no longer was held in the building. At this time, students were transferred to Angier.

In recent years plans were made to tear down the schoolhouse, but members of the Ambassador Extension Homemakers Club initiated the idea of restoring the Williams Grove School and with the help of the Town were successful in acquiring the building and moving it into the Town of Angier, April 1, 1975 to grounds donated by Mr. and Mrs. D.W. Denning, Jr. It was named "Yesteryear Square". The school was restored, is still standing, and may be seen by anyone who wishes.

Much of this information was furnished by W. Carlie Rambeau, who resided near the building all his life and received his education at the school.

Written by: Avis Hall, member-Ambassador Extension Homemakers Club

Quilt Square: Row 7, Number 35

Embroidery by: Annie Lee Smith, member Ambassador Ext. Homemakers